Medic Saving Lives – from Dunkirk to Afghanistan

History / Military

Medic: Saving Lives – from Dunkirk to Afghanistan by John Nichol, Tony Rennell
Harrison E. Salisbury – The 900 Days: The Siege of Leningrad
The Undivided Sky: The Holocaust on East and West German Radio in the 1960s by R. Wolf
Early Inuit Studies: Themes and Transitions, 1850s-1980s by Igor Krupnik
Israel Finkelstein, Neil Asher Silberman, “The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology’s New Vision of Ancient Isreal and the Origin of Sacred Texts”

Medic: Saving Lives – from Dunkirk to Afghanistan by John Nichol, Tony Rennell

Their job is to put themselves in the heart of danger – to run into battle to rescue the wounded and to risk their own lives to try and save the dying. Doctors, nurses, medics and stretcher bearers go where the bullets are thickest, through bomb alleys and mine fields, ducking mortars and rockets, wherever someone is hit and the shout goes up – ‘Medic! We need a medic over here!’ War at its rawest is their domain, an ugly place of shattered bodies, severed limbs, broken heads and death.
This is the story of those brave men – and, increasingly in this day and age, women – who go to war armed with bandages not bombs, scalpels not swords, and put saving life above taking life. Many have died in the process, the ultimate sacrifice for others. But wherever the cry of ‘Medic!’ is heard, it will be answered. From the beaches of Dunkirk to the desert towns of Afghanistan, there can be no nobler cause.

Israel Finkelstein, Neil Asher Silberman, “The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology’s New Vision of Ancient Isreal and the Origin of Sacred Texts”

Is the Bible true? For the last hundred and fifty years a war has been waged over the historical reliability of the Hebrew scriptures. Recent dramatic discoveries of biblical archaeology have cast serious doubt on the familiar account of ancient Israel and the origins of the Judeo-Christian tradition. Though the Bible credits Abraham as the first human to realize there is only one God, we now know that there is no evidence for monotheism for many centuries after the reported time of Abraham. Nor is there any archaeological evidence for the Exodus, for Joshua’s conquest of Canaan, or for the vast “united monarchy” of David and Solomon.
In The Bible Unearthed two leading scholars, an archaeologist and a historian, combine an exhilarating tour of the field of biblical archaeology with a fascinating explanation of how and why the Bible’s historical saga differs so dramatically from the archaeological finds. They explain what the Bible says about ancient Israel and show how it diverges sharply from archaeological reality. They then offer a dramatic new version of the history of ancient Israel, bringing archaeological evidence to bear on the question of when, where, and why the Bible was first written.
What do we know about the time of the ancient patriarchs? When did monotheism first arise? When and where did the first Israelites appear? How did the people of Israel first come to occupy the Promised Land? How extensive was David and Solomon’s kingdom? When and why did Jerusalem become the capital of ancient Israel? All of these questions have new answers.
As to why the answers are so new, Finkelstein and Silberman draw on evidence from decades of archaeological work and dozens of digs in Israel, Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, and Syria, to explain that the key early books of the Bible were first codified in the seventh century BCE, hundreds of years after the core events of the lives of the patriarchs, the Exodus from Egypt, and the conquest of Canaan were said to have taken place.
Yet the ultimate message of The Bible Unearthed is not just a correction of the record. Instead, it is a unique and fascinating explanation of the origins of the Bible. The Bible’s newly identified authors, threatened with political crisis and the intimidation of nearby empires, crafted a brilliant document, a set of stories and teachings that would eventually appeal to the faithful beyond the boundaries of any particular kingdom.
The Bible Unearthed will forever change how you think about the world’s greatest book.

Harrison E. Salisbury – The 900 Days: The Siege of Leningrad

From September 1941 to January 1944, Leningrad was a city under seige from three German armies, with nearly three million people trapped inside. This book gives an account of one of the great dramas of World War II.

The Undivided Sky: The Holocaust on East and West German Radio in the 1960s by R. Wolf

Radio was one of the major weapons used in the Cold War and The Undivided Sky gives a lively and comprehensive account of radio programming and audience responses in the divided Germany of the 1960s by looking at the reportage of major war-crimes trials of the time, issues of the Holocaust and German national identity.

Early Inuit Studies: Themes and Transitions, 1850s-1980s by Igor Krupnik

This collection of 15 chronologically arranged papers is the first-ever definitive treatment of the intellectual history_ _of Eskimology—known today as Inuit studies—the field of anthropology preoccupied with the origins, history, and culture of the Inuit people. The authors trace the growth and change in scholarship on the Inuit (Eskimo) people from the 1850s to the 1980s via profiles of scientists who made major contributions to the field and via intellectual transitions (themes) that furthered such developments. It presents an engaging story of advancement in social research, including anthropology, archaeology, human geography, and linguistics, in the polar regions. Essays written by American, Canadian, Danish, French, and Russian contributors provide for particular trajectories of research and academic tradition in the Arctic for over 130 years.
Most of the essays originated as papers presented at the 18th Inuit Studies Conference hosted by the Smithsonian Institution in October 2012. Yet the book is an organized and integrated narrative; its binding theme is the diffusion of knowledge across disciplinary and national boundaries. A critical element to the story is the changing status of the Inuit people within each of the Arctic nations and the developments in national ideologies of governance, identity, and treatment of indigenous populations. This multifaceted work will resonate with a broad audience of social scientists, students of science history, humanities, and minority studies, and readers of all stripes interested in the Arctic and its peoples.