From Methodology to Methods in Human Psychology

Psychology
From Methodology to Methods in Human Psychology By Dr. Jaan Valsiner
Torkel Klingberg – The Overflowing Brain: Information Overload and the Limits of Working Memory
Sylvie Naar, Steven A. Safren, “Motivational Interviewing and CBT: Combining Strategies for Maximum Effectiveness”
Julie Klam, “The Stars in Our Eyes: The Famous, the Infamous, and Why We Care Way Too Much About Them”
Franco F. Orsucci, “Human Dynamics: A Complexity Science Open Handbook”

From Methodology to Methods in Human Psychology By Dr. Jaan Valsiner

This Brief aims to provide a theoretically innovative introduction to the methodology of the human sciences. It presents a new version of methodology, as a system of mutually linked acts of creating knowledge where both abstract and concrete features of research are intricately intertwined.
It shows how the constructions of particular methods that are used in the science of psychology are interdependent with general psychology. This is exemplified as the Methodology Cycle. The need for an emphasis on the Methodology Cycle grows out of the habitual presentation of methods as if they were independent from the assumptions which they are built upon, with the ultimate goal of searching for and creating universal principles. Chapters discuss the Methodology Cycle and its uses in various areas of empirical study in psychological functions.

Torkel Klingberg – The Overflowing Brain: Information Overload and the Limits of Working Memory

As the pace of technological change accelerates, we are increasingly experiencing a state of information overload. Statistics show that we are interrupted every three minutes during the course of the work day. Multitasking between email, cell-phone, text messages, and four or five websites while listening to an iPod forces the brain to process more and more informaton at greater and greater speeds. And yet the human brain has hardly changed in the last 40,000 years.
Are all these high-tech advances overtaxing our Stone Age brains or is the constant flood of information good for us, giving our brains the daily exercise they seem to crave? In The Overflowing Brain, cognitive scientist Torkel Klingberg takes us on a journey into the limits and possibilities of the brain. He suggests that we should acknowledge and embrace our desire for information and mental challenges, but try to find a balance between demand and capacity. Klingberg explores the cognitive demands, or “complexity,” of everyday life and how the brain tries to meet them. He identifies different types of attention, such as stimulus-driven and controlled attention, but focuses chiefly on “working memory,” our capacity to keep information in mind for short periods of time. Dr Klingberg asserts that working memory capacity, long thought to be static and hardwired in the brain, can be improved by training, and that the increasing demands on working memory may actually have a constructive effect: as demands on the human brain increase, so does its capacity.
The book ends with a discussion of the future of brain development and how we can best handle information overload in our everyday lives. Klingberg suggests how we might find a balance between demand and capacity and move from feeling overwhelmed to deeply engaged.

Sylvie Naar, Steven A. Safren, “Motivational Interviewing and CBT: Combining Strategies for Maximum Effectiveness”

Providing tools to enhance treatment of any clinical problem, this book shows how integrating motivational interviewing (MI) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can lead to better client outcomes than using either approach on its own. The authors demonstrate that MI strategies are ideally suited to boost client motivation and strengthen the therapeutic relationship, whether used as a pretreatment intervention or throughout the course of CBT. User-friendly features include extensive sample dialogues, learning exercises for practitioners, and 35 reproducible client handouts.

Julie Klam, “The Stars in Our Eyes: The Famous, the Infamous, and Why We Care Way Too Much About Them”

From bestselling author Julie Klam comes a lively and engaging exploration of celebrity: why celebrities fascinate us, what it means to be famous today, and why celebrities are so important.
“When I was young I was convinced celebrities could save me,” Julie Klam admits in The Stars in Our Eyes, her funny and personal exploration of fame and celebrity. As she did for subjects as wide-ranging as dogs, mothers, and friendship, Klam brings her infectious curiosity and crackling wit to the topic of celebrity. As she admits, “I’ve always been enamored with celebrities,” be they movie stars, baseball players, TV actors, and now Internet sensations. “They are the us we want to be.” Celebrities today have a global presence and can be, Klam writes, “some girl on Instagram who does nude yoga and has 3.5 million followers, a thirteen-year-old ‘viner,’ and a Korean rapper who posts his videos that are viewed millions of times.”
In The Stars in Our Eyes, Klam examines this phenomenon. She delves deep into what makes someone a celebrity, explains why we care about celebrities more than ever, and uncovers the bargains they make with the public and the burdens they bear to sustain this status. The result is an engaging, astute, and eye-opening look into celebrity that reveals the truths about fame as it elucidates why it’s such an important part of life today.

Franco F. Orsucci, “Human Dynamics: A Complexity Science Open Handbook”

This is probably the first multi authored open handbook of complexity science in human dynamics and psychotherapy, beyond determinism and reductionism. Its multiplicity, plurality, and polysemy reflect the true nature of the field by ensuring appropriate degrees of freedom for clients, therapists, scientists, scholars, students, and multidisciplinary readers.
This book, though mostly focused on psychotherapy and its evolution in the perspective of complexity science, shows how this is just a special case for a general theory of human change. The book also presents how, through the use of the complexity science toolbox, a general model of psychotherapy is gradually emerging. This special meta-model for psychotherapy can be extended to a general model of human dynamics.
This open handbook is a work in motion, partially leaving some of its constituents opportunities for future evolutions. In this open work, there is a reflection of the intrinsic complexity of the human dynamics field and a refusal of the epistemological violence of linearization. We invite you to use it as a toolbox where you can find tools and inspirations to facilitate the self-organization of other human beings, and your own.
We designed it to be a companion for human change explorers of the 21st century. A demonstration of this plural epistemology is that the authors represented in this open handbook come from different human sciences and psychotherapy milieus, use different methodologies, but share the same deep theory. They form new meta-praxis, meta-theory, and meta-models towards a new shape of human change.