Dissenting Japan A History of Japanese Radicalism and Counterculture, from 1945 to Fukushima

History / Military

William Andrews, “Dissenting Japan: A History of Japanese Radicalism and Counterculture, from 1945 to Fukushima”
Before Einstein: The Fourth Dimension in Fin-de-Siecle Literature and Culture (Anthem Nineteenth-Century) by Elizabeth L Throesch
Rituals of the Past: Prehispanic and Colonial Case Studies in Andean Archaeology by Silvana Rosenfeld
The Historical Encyclopedia of World War II
Aakash Singh Rathore, Rimina Mohapatra, “Hegel’s India: A Reinterpretation, with Texts”

William Andrews, “Dissenting Japan: A History of Japanese Radicalism and Counterculture, from 1945 to Fukushima”

Conformist, mute and malleable? Andrews tackles head-on this absurd caricature of Japanese society in his fascinating history of its militant sub-cultures, radical societies and well-established traditions of dissent.
Following the March 2011 Tsunami and Fukushima nuclear crisis, the media remarked with surprise on how thousands of demonstrators had flocked to the streets of Tokyo. But mass protest movements are nothing new in Japan. The post-war period experienced years of unrest and violence on both sides of the political spectrum: from demos to riots, strikes, campus occupations, factional infighting, assassinations and even international terrorism.
This is the first comprehensive history in English of political radicalism and counterculture in Japan, as well as of the artistic developments during this turbulent time. It chronicles the major events and movements from 1945 to the new flowering of protests and civil dissent in the wake of Fukushima. Introducing readers to often ignored aspects of Japanese society, it explores the fascinating ideologies and personalities on the Right and the Left, including the student movement, militant groups and communes. While some elements parallel developments in Europe and America, much of Japan’s radical recent past (and present) is unique and offers valuable lessons for understanding the context to the new waves of anti-government protests the nation is currently witnessing.
‘This much-needed book addresses a range of groups engaged in revolutionary politics, radical protests and counter-culture. In doing so, it provides a perspective on Japanese society that is rarely covered in English … Dissenting Japan is a necessary text, and a compelling intellectual call to arms.’ — Japan Times
Andrews’ brilliant account of Japan’s marginalised narrative of postwar dissent and activism brims with insights, passion and astute analysis. This is a lucidly written, well-researched people’s history that gives voice to the voiceless and demonstrates a shrewd understanding of Japanese society, leftist political culture and the politics of ongoing culture wars. There is nothing quite like this masterpiece of postwar history, and as such it is a must-read for anyone seeking to understand the Japan and Japanese lurking behind the misleading memes of harmony, tranquility, and deference to authority.’ — Jeffrey Kingston, Director of Asian Studies, Temple University (Japan Campus)
‘William Andrews’ timely book provides invaluable insights into key events, movements, and ideas that shaped post-war Japanese radicalism. Andrews brings to the surface a history that is often unseen, concealed, or poorly understood — yet continues to exert substantial influence on today’s emergent protests following the 2011 triple disaster.’ — Robin O’Day, Department of History and Anthropology, The University of Tsukuba
‘William Andrews vividly details a history not previously available in English. This book guides the reader through the contested terrain of postwar Japanese politics and protest, challenging stereotypes of an inherently harmonious Japanese society. A gripping read for even those casually curious about the shape of contemporary dissent in Japan.’ — Chelsea Szendi Schieder, Meiji University, School of Political Science and Economics

Before Einstein: The Fourth Dimension in Fin-de-Siecle Literature and Culture (Anthem Nineteenth-Century) by Elizabeth L Throesch

‘Before Einstein’ examines the discourse of hyperspace philosophy and its position within the network of ‘new’ ideas at the end of the nineteenth century. Hyperspace philosophy grew out of the concept of a fourth spatial dimension, an idea that became increasingly debated amongst mathematicians, physicists and philosophers during the 1870s and 80s. English mathematician and hyperspace philosopher Charles Howard Hinton was the chief populariser of the fourth dimension in Europe and North America. The influence of his writings, many of which were published as a series under the title of ‘Scientific Romances’, ranged surprisingly wide.
‘Before Einstein’ offers, for the first time, an extended examination of Hinton’s work and – crucially – the influence of his ideas on contemporary writers and thinkers. Increasingly over the past three decades, critical attention has been given to the relevance of pre-Einsteinian theories of the fourth dimension within the shifting aesthetic and cultural values at the turn of the twentieth century. For the first time in a full-length literary study, ‘Before Einstein’ addresses the cultural life of the fourth dimension at the turn of the century. ‘Before Einstein’ begins by tracing the development of spatial theories of the fourth dimension out of the ‘new’, non-Euclidean geometries of the mid-nineteenth century, and proceeds to analyse Hinton’s role as four-dimensional theorist and populariser of hyperspace philosophy. Hinton’s ‘Scientific Romances’ are examined in detail, not simply as documents of interest for historians of science and ideas, but for their intrinsic literary value as well. Additionally, ‘Before Einstein’ captures the work of H. G. Wells, Henry James and William James through the lens of Hinton’s writing, identifying what can be described as a four-dimensional literary aesthetic. The book addresses the existing gap in literary studies of the fourth dimension, while also providing scholars of the James brothers and Wells with new ways of approaching their subject matter.

Rituals of the Past: Prehispanic and Colonial Case Studies in Andean Archaeology by Silvana Rosenfeld

Rituals of the Past explores the various approaches archaeologists use to identify ritual in the material record and discusses the influence ritual had on the formation, reproduction, and transformation of community life in past Andean societies. A diverse group of established and rising scholars from across the globe investigates how ritual influenced, permeated, and altered political authority, economic production, shamanic practice, landscape cognition, and religion in the Andes over a period of three thousand years.
Contributors deal with theoretical and methodological concerns including non-human and human agency; the development and maintenance of political and religious authority, ideology, cosmologies, and social memory; and relationships with ritual action. The authors use a diverse array of archaeological, ethnographic, and linguistic data and historical documents to demonstrate the role ritual played in prehispanic, colonial, and post-colonial Andean societies throughout the regions of Peru, Chile, Bolivia, and Argentina. By providing a diachronic and widely regional perspective, Rituals of the Past shows how ritual is vital to understanding many aspects of the formation, reproduction, and change of past lifeways in Andean societies.
Contributors: Sarah Abraham, Carlos Angiorama, Florencia Avila, Camila Capriata Estrada, David Chicoine, Daniel Contreras, Matthew Edwards, Francesca Fernandini, Matthew Helmer, Hugo Ikehara, Enrique Lopez-Hurtado, Jerry Moore, Axel Nielsen, Yoshio Onuki, John Rick, Mario Ruales, Koichiro Shibata, Hendrik Van Gijseghem, Rafael Vega-Centeno, Verity Whalen

The Historical Encyclopedia of World War II

Aakash Singh Rathore, Rimina Mohapatra, “Hegel’s India: A Reinterpretation, with Texts”

In his writings on India, Hegel characterized Indian thought as “fantastic,” “subjective,” “wild,” “dreamy,” “frenzied,” “absurd,” and “repetitive.” If Indian art, religion, and philosophy were so inadequate, what explains his lifelong fascination with India? This unique volume brings together Hegel’s reflections and argues that Indian thought haunted him, representing a nemesis to his own philosophy. Further, it indicates that the longstanding critical appraisals of Hegel are incommensurate with his detailed explorations of Indian thought.
Hegel distinguished his own thought on two grounds. The first was to focus on freedom and to rail perpetually against the caste system. The second was to indicate the necessity for dialectical mediation, and thus to reprove the stasis of Indian thought. But did Hegel ever manage to exorcise the evil twin that beset his work?
Shedding new light on Indological and Hegelian studies, this book systematically presents all of Hegel’s writings on and about India for the first time, including translations of his lesser-known essays on the Bhagavad-Gita and the Oriental Spirit, along with a substantive reinterpretation and a bibliography.