Creating Performances for Teaching and Learning A Practice Session for Pedagogy (Creativity, Education and the Arts)

Creating Performances for Teaching and Learning A Practice Session for Pedagogy (Creativity, Education and the Arts)

Psychology
Creating Performances for Teaching and Learning: A Practice Session for Pedagogy (Creativity, Education and the Arts) by Chris McRae
The Ellipsis Manual: analysis and engineering of human behavior by Chase Hughes
Mario Livio, “Why?: What Makes Us Curious”
Don Joseph Goewey, “The End of Stress: Four Steps to Rewire Your Brain”
Burnout, Fatigue, Exhaustion: An Interdisciplinary Perspective on a Modern Affliction by Sighard Neckel

Creating Performances for Teaching and Learning: A Practice Session for Pedagogy (Creativity, Education and the Arts) by Chris McRae

This book uses the metaphors of practice spaces and practice sessions to demonstrate the connection between creative and performance practices, and critical pedagogy. It offers a conceptual framework for using performance and creative practices as starting points for developing philosophies and practices of teaching that are grounded in aesthetic, creative, and critical approaches to education. The practice sessions for pedagogy presented include a range of creative endeavours, such as performance workshops, musical routines, crafting practices, and writing. By focusing on the critical function of creative practices, the book emphasizes the ways creativity can reveal the relationship between everyday acts, and social and cultural ideologies and structures. Creative practices also present the opportunity for imagining new, more socially just and inclusive, configurations of these relationships. This book is designed for teachers and students interested in critical pedagogy, performance, and creative educational practices.

The Ellipsis Manual: analysis and engineering of human behavior by Chase Hughes

The Ellipsis Manual is the kind of book that used to be locked away…deep in a vault underground…far away from the prying eyes of those who could misuse its power.
With chapter titles like ‘Methods of physically hacking the brain’ and ‘Shutting off human willpower,’ what you’re about to learn could make even the most well-trained CIA operative blush…
And that’s what leads me to say that if you’re going to pick up your copy of The Ellipsis Manual today, you’ve got to make a firm commitment not to go to the dark side with this material.

Mario Livio, “Why?: What Makes Us Curious”

Astrophysicist and author Mario Livio investigates perhaps the most human of all our characteristics—curiosity—as he explores our innate desire to know why.
Experiments demonstrate that people are more distracted when they overhear a phone conversation—where they can know only one side of the dialogue—than when they overhear two people talking and know both sides. Why does half a conversation make us more curious than a whole conversation?
In the ever-fascinating Why? Mario Livio interviewed scientists in several fields to explore the nature of curiosity. He examined the lives of two of history’s most curious geniuses, Leonardo da Vinci and Richard Feynman. He also talked to people with boundless curiosity: a superstar rock guitarist who is also an astrophysicist; an astronaut with degrees in computer science, biology, literature, and medicine. What drives these people to be curious about so many subjects?
Curiosity is at the heart of mystery and suspense novels. It is essential to other forms of art, from painting to sculpture to music. It is the principal driver of basic scientific research. Even so, there is still no definitive scientific consensus about why we humans are so curious, or about the mechanisms in our brain that are responsible for curiosity.
Mario Livio—an astrophysicist who has written about mathematics, biology, and now psychology and neuroscience—explores this irresistible subject in a lucid, entertaining way that will captivate anyone who is curious about curiosity.

Don Joseph Goewey, “The End of Stress: Four Steps to Rewire Your Brain”

We all know that stress is serious. If ignored too long, it becomes life-threateningly serious. Yet 83 percent of Americans are doing nothing about it. Don’t be one of them. There’s now a solution to stress that literally rewires your brain for a life of doing well, and being well, on your way to flourishing.
The most important brain discovery in the last 400 years concerns a simple but powerful shift in attitude that can change a brain wired for stress into a brain powered for success. This specific shift literally rewires the brain to deliver the full measure of intelligence, creativity, and emotional balance that enables you to flourish instead of struggle. It’s a higher state of mind anyone can attain stimulating the higher brain function that unblocks the health, wealth, and love we all desire.
Fail to make this shift and you will lack the brainpower to fulfill your dreams. Your stress provoking brain will continue to dump toxic stress hormones into your system, shrinking brain mass, limiting brain bandwidth, depressing your emotional set point, and shortening your lifespan.
You can solve these problems and fulfill your aspirations. The End of Stress: Four Steps to Rewire Your Brain guides you through an evidence-based process that achieves this powerful shift. The book is designed as a workshop-in-a-book, supported by a website of tools, audio files, and materials that make it easy.

Burnout, Fatigue, Exhaustion: An Interdisciplinary Perspective on a Modern Affliction by Sighard Neckel

This interdisciplinary book explores both the connections and the tensions between sociological, psychological, and biological theories of exhaustion. It examines how the prevalence of exhaustion – both as an individual experience and as a broader socio-cultural phenomenon – is manifest in the epidemic rise of burnout, depression, and chronic fatigue. It provides innovative analyses of the complex interplay between the processes involved in the production of mental health diagnoses, socio-cultural transformations, and subjective illness experiences. Using many of the existing ideologically charged exhaustion theories as case studies, the authors investigate how individual discomfort and wider social dynamics are interrelated. Covering a broad range of topics, this book will appeal to those working in the fields of psychology, sociology, medicine, psychiatry, literature, and history.