Manifest Rationality A Pragmatic Theory of Argument

Psychology

Ralph H. Johnson, “Manifest Rationality: A Pragmatic Theory of Argument”
The Boy Who Could Run But Not Walk: Real Hope for Children with Early Brain Damage by Karen Pape
Anthony Storr, “Churchill’s Black Dog: Kafka’s Mice, and Other Phenomena of the Human Mind”
Ann Demarais Ph.D., Valerie White Ph.D., “First Impressions: What You Don’t Know About How Others See You”
Beyond Stuttering: The McGuire Programme for Getting Good at the Sport of Speaking by Dave McGuire

Ralph H. Johnson, “Manifest Rationality: A Pragmatic Theory of Argument”

This book works through some of the theoretical issues that have been accumulating in informal logic over the past 20 years. At the same time, it defines a core position in the theory of argument in which those issues can be further explored. The underlying concern that motivates this work is the health of practice of argumentation as an important cultural artifact. A further concern is for logic as a discipline. Argumentative and dialectical in nature, this book presupposes some awareness of the theory of argument in recent history, and some familiarity with the positions that have been advanced. It will be of interest to academics, researchers, and advanced undergraduate and graduate students in the disciplines of logic, rhetoric, linguistics, speech communication, English composition, and psychology.

The Boy Who Could Run But Not Walk: Real Hope for Children with Early Brain Damage by Karen Pape

In the tradition of Oliver Sacks and Norman Doidge, Dr. Karen Pape, a respected neonatologist and clinical neuroscientist, demonstrates that neuroplasticity, the ability of the brain to change and heal itself, can transform children’s lives, just as it has transformed the outlook for adults suffering from brain injuries like stroke or Alzheimer’s. With profound implications for the nearly seventeen million children and adults worldwide living with cerebral palsy, The Boy Who Could Run But Not Walk demonstrates that cerebral palsy is not an incurable condition. The movement disorders are a physical habit that can be changed, with a lot of hard work. These stories of children’s recovery and improvements are a revelation—surprising, inspiring and illuminating, offering real hope for some of the world’s most vulnerable children. The significance of the title: The Boy Who Could Run But Not Walk demonstrates the power of unconscious assumptions in medicine and science. The boy had cerebral palsy affecting one side of his body and he learned to walk badly with poor balance, but he was also able to play in a competitive junior soccer league. Dr Pape explains that we walk and run with the same parts of the brain. This means that if the run is normal, then the brain has recovered. The explanation is simple. He learned to walk with a damaged, immature brain. He learned to play soccer with a recovered, more mature brain. Doctors are trained to look at the abnormal walk, not more competent, later learned skills.** This book offers readers a new understanding of how the baby brain grows** and recovers differently than an adult brain.

Anthony Storr, “Churchill’s Black Dog: Kafka’s Mice, and Other Phenomena of the Human Mind”

‘Extremely engaging… A book full of good moments and humane insights.’Alan Ryan, Observer
This book collects the essays of one of England’s best-known and most distinguished psychiatrists. Its theme is creativity. What internal dynamic forces artists, scientists and politicians to devote so much time and energy to creative invention? Anthony Storr weighs and tests Freud’s theory that creativity is the result of dissatisfaction by examining the impulses which drove such figures as Churchill, Kafka and Newton. Whether he is exploring the ‘divine discontent’ that motivates creativity, analysing Jung’s mid-life crisis, assessing the psychology of jealousy in Othello or denouncing the abuses of psychiatry, Storr brings wisdom, erudition and compassion to all his subjects in this highly readable and human collection, which is accessible to those who know nothing about psychoanalysis as well as to those who know a great deal.

Ann Demarais Ph.D., Valerie White Ph.D., “First Impressions: What You Don’t Know About How Others See You”

What kind of first impression do you make? A first impression is the most important impression you’ll ever make—and you get only one chance to make it. Business deals can be made or broken, first dates become second dates or not, friendships are created or fail to form; everything hinges on that all-important initial encounter. And yet most of us don’t know how we’re really seen by others. Many of us don’t know how to make a good impression.
Wouldn’t you like others to see you as confident, interesting, attractive, and sincere? Ann Demarais, Ph.D., and Valerie White, Ph.D., consultants to many Fortune 100 companies as well as creators of First Impressions, Inc., a New York–based dating and consulting firm, offer you the keys to putting your best self forward in any new situation, whether you want to strike up a conversation at a party or are meeting a blind date or a new business client.
You’ll learn to see yourself as others see you, and how to tweak your style to create the impression that reflects the real you. Breaking down a successful first impression into its seven fundamentals, the authors show you how to master these principles so that you can make the best first impression. They also show how to avoid common misunderstandings that leave others with a bad impression, how to reveal the four universal social gifts, and they outline practical steps you can take to enhance your personal charm.
Informative and filled with enlightening research studies, do-it-yourself checklist reviews, and dozens of helpful case histories, First Impressions is a fun, groundbreaking, and long-overdue guide to the most important moment of virtually any relationship: the first.

Beyond Stuttering: The McGuire Programme for Getting Good at the Sport of Speaking by Dave McGuire

Combining mental strategies with breathing techniques, this book explains the McGuire Program, a proven technique for long-term improvement in speech and self-confidence for those who suffer from stuttering. Developed through the author’s own struggles, readers learn to alter breathing patterns while incorporating mental strategies to maintain fluent speech. This complete program quickly and dramatically improves verbal fluency while the sufferer gains self-esteem from learning to control the physical and mental aspects of dysfunctional breathing. This second edition has been revised to incorporate the development of the methods of the McGuire Program and updated to include the inspirational stories of graduates of the McGuire Program.