Traumatic Memories of the Second World War and After

Traumatic Memories of the Second World War and After
The US Commitment to NATO in the Post-Cold War Period
The Encyclopedia of Ancient Giants in North America
The Archaeology of Houses and Households in the Native Southeast
Kiowa Belief and Ritual

Язык: Английский

Traumatic Memories of the Second World War and After

This collection investigates the social and cultural history of trauma to offer a comparative analysis of its individual, communal, and political effects in the twentieth century. Particular attention is given to witness testimony, to procedures of personal memory and collective commemoration, and to visual sources as they illuminate the changing historical nature of trauma. The essays draw on diverse methodologies, including oral history, and use varied sources such as literature, film and the broadcast media. The contributions discuss imaginative, communal and political responses, as well as the ways in which the later welfare of traumatized individuals is shaped by medical, military, and civilian institutions. Incorporating innovative methodologies and offering a thorough evaluation of current research, the book shows new directions in historical trauma studies.

The US Commitment to NATO in the Post-Cold War Period

This book examines the continuing US commitments to NATO in the post-Cold War era. The initial focus is on the recommitment decisions of the Clinton administration. It also extensively explores the US operations in Kosovo, Afghanistan and, in particular, Libya. The case study on Libya is especially important in exploring the Obama administration’s understanding of the purpose of NATO in the context of current economic pressures, domestic US debates about post-War on Terror interventions, and of increasing American preoccupation with Pacific rather than European security. The author utilises substantial archival research and interviews with policymakers and academics, including Ambassador Kethleen Stephens, former Special Assistant to the President Stephen J. Flanagan, and former Director for Non-proliferation at National Security Council Robert S. Litwak. This book is ideal for postgraduate researchers and academics in US foreign policy, foreign policy decision-making, transatlantic relations and NATO, as well as a great use to undergraduate students.

The Encyclopedia of Ancient Giants in North America

888 Human Giants Documented
Giant Human Remains Uncovered in 47 States
Native American Legends of an Ancient Race of Giants
Giants With Double Rows of Teeth
Giants With Horns Protruding From Their Foreheads
Giant Mummified Remains
Mass Graves of Ancient Dwarfs
Advanced Mathematics Used in the Construction of Earthworks
The discovery of giant humans in North America is the result of pouring through over 10,000 State, County and Township histories at one of the largest genealogical libraries in America. Hundreds of additional accounts were also found within newspaper archives.
888 historical accounts of giant human skeletons discovered in North America is the largest collection in print. The Encyclopedia of Ancient Giants in North America chronicles two distinct waves of giant humans migrating to North America. As early as 7,000 B.C., strange people arrived on the North American shores of gigantic size with Neanderthal looking skulls. Their spread across the American landscape is documented not only by their massive skeletons but by an identical material culture that was found buried with their remains. Double rows of teeth and skulls with protruding horns make them one of America’s most intriguing mysteries. At the advent of the Bronze Age another migration of giant humans found their way to North America. A persistent legend exists with Native Americans of a people who came to trade and mine the copper from the Upper Great Lakes. They left an indelible mark upon the landscape of the Ohio Valley with their large burial mounds and earthworks aligned to solar, lunar and stellar events. The measurements of these works reveal that they were constructed with the knowledge of advanced mathematics and geometry.

The Archaeology of Houses and Households in the Native Southeast

Benjamin A. Steere’s compelling study explores the evolution of houses and households in the southeastern United States from the Woodland to the Historic Indian period (ca. 200 BC to 1800 AD).
The Archaeology of Houses and Households in the Native Southeast contributes enormously to the study of household archaeology and domestic architecture in the region. This significant volume combines both previously published and unpublished data on communities from the Southeast and is the first systematic attempt to understand the development of houses and households as interpreted through a theoretical framework developed from broad-ranging studies in cultural anthropology and archaeology.
Steere’s major achievement is the compilation of one of the largest and most detailed architectural datasets for the Southeast, including data for 1,258 domestic and public structures from 65 archaeological sites in North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and the southern parts of Missouri, Indiana, and Illinois. Rare data from hard-to-find cultural resource management reports is also incorporated, creating a broad temporal and geographic scope and serving as one of many remarkable features of the book, which is sure to be of considerable value to archaeologists and anthropologists interested in comparative studies of architecture.
Similar to other analyses, Steere’s research uses multiple theoretical angles and lines of evidence to answer archaeological questions about houses and the people who built them. However, unlike other examinations of household archaeology, this project spans multiple time periods (Woodland, Mississippian, and Historic); is focused squarely on the Southeast; features a more unified approach, using data from a single, uniform database; and privileges domestic architecture as a line of evidence for reconstructing daily life at major archaeological sites on a much broader scale than other investigations.

Kiowa Belief and Ritual

Directed by anthropologist Alexander Lesser in 1935, the Santa Fe Laboratory of Anthropology sponsored a field school in southwestern Oklahoma that focused on the neighboring Kiowas. During two months, graduate students compiled more than 1,300 pages of single-spaced field notes derived from cross-interviewing thirty-five Kiowas. These eyewitness and first-generation reflections on the horse and buffalo days are undoubtedly the best materials available for reconstructing pre-reservation Kiowa beliefs and rituals. The field school compiled massive data resulting in a number of publications on this formerly nomadic Plains tribe, though the planned collaborative ethnographies never materialized. The extensive Kiowa field notes, which contain invaluable information, remained largely unpublished until now.

In Kiowa Belief and Ritual, Benjamin R. Kracht reconstructs Kiowa cosmology during the height of the horse and buffalo culture from field notes pertaining to cosmology, visions, shamans, sorcery, dream shields, tribal bundles, and the now-extinct Sun Dance ceremony. These topics are interpreted through the Kiowa concept of a power force permeating the universe. Additional data gleaned from the field notes of James Mooney and Alice Marriott enrich the narrative. Drawing on more than thirty years of field experiences, Kracht’s discussion of how indigenous notions of “power” are manifested today significantly enhances the existing literature concerning Plains religions.